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Search Results 0 to 35 of about 36 (some duplicates have been removed)
us at s f gvment gov tv dot ordinary care an and before i be a slave i'll be buried in my grave and go home to my lord and be free no more violence no more violence no more violence over me over me and before i be a slave i'll be buried in my grave and go home to my lord and be free >> i want y'all to sing it with me now. ♪ oh, oh, freedom oh, freedom o freedom over me over me and before i be a slave i'll be buried in my grave and go home to my lord and be free (applause) >> thank you. >> thank you very much. thank you. good afternoon, ladies and gentlemen. i'm al williams, president of the board of directors of san francisco african-american historical and cultural society. on behalf of the society and our co-presenters, the san francisco african-american chamber of commerce, the bayview ymca, senator mark leno's office, the san francisco public library, and the mayor's office of neighborhood services, welcome to the 2013 black history month program. the 2013 black history month theme is "at the crossroads of freedom and equality, the emancipation proclamation and the march o
of our operating revenue from membership dues f. you're not a member of the society, please join us or renew your membership today. i should note that anyone who joins or renews a membership today will receive a free autographed copy of our keynote speaker's new book, the title of which is martin's dream: my journey and the legacy of martin luther king, jr. we have a terrific program planned for you today. of course, the heart of the program will be our speaker, will be the remarks of our keynote speaker dr. claiborne parson. you have a program in front of you -- with you, and we will be following the program. we do have a number of members of the city's official family here with us today. the list of which i don't have and the number of community dignitaries. i see that we do have supervisor scott wiener, supervisor president of the board of supervisors david chiu, president cisneros, barbara garcia is with us. naomi is going to be part of the program. naomi kelly is with us, kim brandon from the port commission is with us, and a number of others. i'll be getting a list, i'll be ab
for military use has no reason to be in our homes and on our streets. and, so, we are introducing legislation focused on what has been labeled to be the hollow point bullets, but there are other types of bullets that are designed for more massive destruction of the human body that should only be in the hands of law enforcement and the military, and not in the civilian hands at all. and we want to ban them from possession in our city of san francisco. so, we're introducing legislation aimed at that kind of ballistics ammunition and banning them from possession in our city. the second piece of legislation is we believe that any person who purchases more than 500 rounds of any type of ammunition, notice should go to our police chief so that we have time to investigate as to reasons why that purchase should be made and understand who is making it. so, we are introducing a second piece of legislation about notification to our police chief of any of that kind of high level of purchase. these are at least two things that we are introducing today. there are potentially more to come, but we wanted to
here in the 21st century. and if you look around, many of those men and women are right here with us in the rotunda today. we remember the people who braved police dogs and fire hoses turned against them by their own government officials in the south, people who believed that an idea -- believed in an idea that we're all created equal and that we're willing to risk and that we're willing to risk their life in the purchase soul of a lofty promise in america. today we celebrate black history month and the catalyst to progress that the emancipation proclamation as well as the march on washington provided us. we are familiar with the incarnation, whether it's the work of gandhi, mother theresa, or nelson mandela, people who have carried the torch of love and equality into the dark caves of tyrany and emerged bloody, but unbowed, they are examples of love's true limitless potential. thank you. (applause) >> and even, and even in the face of institutional hatred, the legacy of their work is a beacon for the world that loves will triumphant at the end of the day. it's triumphant because lo
they are treading down. slowly but surely being restricted to the fringe while the rest of us march on holding hands to our collective prosperity. and, so, here we are today gathered once again on an annual basis. we've come to celebrate black history month. and we are celebrating ourselves. we are celebrating ourselves for the transformations that we have gone through, our sacrifice, and our willingness to look ourselves in the mirror, to transform ourselves into a better society, a better country and a better city. now today we stand on the shoulders of the great giants who came before us -- oh, that's my signal. [laughter] >> no respect. [laughter] >> fortunate for al williams i'm almost done. today we stand on the great shoulders of the folks that have come before us. and i wish you all a very happy and empowering black history month. i do have one piece of business that i'd like to share with you. on tuesday, i, along with the co-sponsorship of supervisor breed introduced a resolution celebrating the 100th birthday of sister rosa parks and commemorating the modern civil rights leader for her co
health department as well. the question for us, then, is what do we do about it? and not only can we share in this tragedy and signal our sympathies to the families as we've done, but we've got to do something more. and this is where i want to make sure i recognize all of the people that are in that effort of doing something about it, including the officials in san francisco. and some have been at this longer than others to try to do something about it, have reached limitations. yet again, i think this tragedy at sandy hook reminds us that we've got to keep trying and we've got to keep doing more about it. and, so, i want to first of all recognize that senator feinstein, in my conversations with her, and the tragedies she's experienced as mayor of san francisco as well as her attempts to ban assault weapons and had done so in the past, and that her federal assault legislation, while ended, she will reintroduce that in january and we will be big supporters of that. and she will continue dialoguing on a national level, and we will support her efforts and the efforts of all of our feder
policing using both data and technology to help us do that. and then, of course, i think the most important part is to organize our communities and work with community-based organizations, families, religious groups, and everybody that's on the ground to find more ways to intervene in violent behavior out there and utilize resources such as education systems, our community jobs programs, others that might allow people to go in different direction. the unfortunate and very tragic incident in connecticut in sandy hook elementary school of course heightened everybody's awareness of what violence can really be all about. and as we have been not only responding, reacting to this national tragedy that i think president obama has adequately described as broken all of our hearts, and in every funeral that has taken place, for those 20 innocent children and six innocent adults in the school districts, and school administrators, we obviously have shared in that very tragic event, all of us. it has touched everybody across this country. san francisco is no different. and i have shared that emotional e
. (applause) >> but we also have tremendous help from people who are helping us create the policies and the accountability in all the different departments. melva davis, kim brandon, willie adams at the port, chuck collins, [speaker not understood], the reverend amos brown, denise tyson, linda richardson, sonya harris, patricia thomas, veronica honeycut, these are just the names of a few of our commissioners who are heading up those very important divisions of our city. and they are joining with me and with the supervisors and with the department heads to do what mrs. obama asked us to do. whenever we occupy these public positions throughout the city or throughout the state or throughout the nation, we do the right thing, we keep the doors of opportunity open and enriched for everybody else. and we're already seeing it happen. yesterday i was at the luncheon for the boys and girls club, wonderful, wonderful entity that's reaching out to all of our young high school kids and make sure they're motivated to go to college. you should have heard them talk about their futures. you should
're still working out the kinks over here. can you tell us a little slack here. see, mr. gibbs, how are you? >>> i'm good. >> good, thank you for your service as well. can you tell me how long you served on the commission? prior? >>> probably 15 years. >> you served on the veteran affairs commission. what capacity were you serving? >>> as president for two years, otherwise i was commissioner. >> um-hm. and what were the circumstances that lead you to leave the commission? you said -- >>> i moved to europe. >> okay. >>> yeah. >> and you came back and you're looking to volunteer some more time, right? >>> yeah, yeah. i thought it's a position i could be in, have a voice in, yes. >> 15 years is a long time. that's very impressive. can you point to some successes or some of the things or projects that you worked on while you were on the commission? >>> for me, successes right now, i think the commission is strong right now than it's ever been. in terms of personal suck is hetionvxes, i can't speak of any. >> come on, you were president. you did something. >>> i'm telling you the truth. for me a
unified public school teachers came and learned to use cooking for the core standards. we range all over the place. we really want everyone to feel like they can be included in the conversation. a lot of organizations i think which say we're going to teach cooking or we're going to teach gardening, or we're going to get in the policy side of the food from conversation. we say all of that is connected and we want to provide a place that feels really community oriented where you can be interested in multiple of those things or one of those things and have an entree point to meet people. we want to build community and we're using food as a means to that end. >> we have a wonderful organization to be involved with obviously coming from buy right where really everyone is treated very much like family. coming into 18 reasons which even more community focused is such a treat. we have these events in the evening and we really try and bring people together. people come in in groups, meet friends that they didn't even know they had before. our whole set up is focused on communal table. you can sit
Search Results 0 to 35 of about 36 (some duplicates have been removed)